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Jul 20 2014 - The time had finally arrived! After spending many years toiling in grade school, taking tests and playing sports, trying to be taken seriously (and failing), struggling to survive with only the legal minimum of cool, I was finally at the pinnacle of my achievements! I was in my dorm, on my own, out of the house, readying for some serious education. There was about two weeks of socials and meetings for new arrivals scheduled before my first class, and I spent my time walking through the grand hal...
Bryan Healey   •   113 views   •   1 comments
 
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Jul 17 2014 - Born and raised in Massachusetts; I spent my youth north of Worcester, was educated in Boston, and spent several years in the Back Bay. I know where the best restaurants are, have a favorite Newbury haunt, have walked every inch of the freedom trail, can direct the best routes through the city and into metro-west, and know the best spot to watch the fireworks. In many ways, I still feel quite close to the middle colony, and I will always keep a special place in my heart for my old home. But I have been adopted by Rhode Island! I have found the pleasures of 384 miles of coastline and islands, apple farms and mansions, WaterFire and Watch Hill, coffee milk and Federal Hill, the Bristol parade, Roger Williams Park, and some of the best rolling woodlands in the northeast. What was once only the product of a worklife decision, Rhode Island has burrowed it's way into my heart and made a nest. And as a consequence, in ways not felt since my Boston departure, I find myself caring, often deeply, that my adoptive state succeed. A pure New England man, deep to my core, I have now many homes, and must help keep them stand tall and strong.
Bryan Healey   •   104 views   •   0 comments
 
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Jul 11 2014 - I consider myself a relatively engaged individual; I stay on top of local, regional, national, and international news, and try to be relatively well informed of the happenings in political and economic theater. The tragedy of engagement, however, is the overwhelming sentiment of negativity; the news cycle, for obvious reasons, puts emphasis on the negative, and much of politics has an unfortunate tendency to be reactive instead of proactive. Every once in a while, I have to encourage myself to withdraw from the fray, even if only for minutes, take a long and deep breath, and spend just a little while looking at trees (or the stars, or mountains, or the ocean) and remember that we'll all be dead someday. It helps me keep my balance and perspective; these things may be important to us, but there is a grandness and fragility to existence that supercedes our struggles -- because of our impermanence. I find strange comfort and increased passion in knowing that.
Bryan Healey   •   76 views   •   0 comments
 
 
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Jun 13 2014 - It was refreshing to see such a large public company like Tesla Motors be so eager to release their patented technology for public consumption. Patents have a noble purpose, but they have been abused and misused for decades to stifle innovation for unnecessarily long periods of time, and are long overdue for a legislative revisit. Tesla will certai...
Bryan Healey   •   41 views   •   0 comments
 
 
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Apr 01 2014 - I recently watched a video clip from the Smithsonian that was created in the 1930s depicting real Civil War veterans re-enacting the battle cry of the Confederacy. I was able to watch this rare video over a wireless internet connection from a computer that I store in my pocket, which has more power than the computer that controlled the Apollo rocke...
Bryan Healey   •   110 views   •   0 comments
 
 
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Mar 28 2014 - I would like to offer up a random factoid: In the English nursery rhyme Humpty Dumpty, there is no clear textual indication that Humpty Dumpty was an egg, despite the colloquialism. In fact, Humpty Dumpty was the name of a large damaged cannon that the Royal infantry could not repair, which caused the Royalists to lose control of the town of Colchester in the Siege of Colchester in 1648 during the English Civil War.
Bryan Healey   •   82 views   •   0 comments
 
 
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Mar 26 2014 - I have an irrational love of skyscrapers. I think the reason for this love is that the skyscraper is one of the few pure, consistent, widespread monuments of human achievement. Each one proclaims loudly and obnoxiously: Humanity is here, we are awesome, and we win! I have similar feelings about the Saturn V, the USS Nimitz, the CERN supercollider, ...
Bryan Healey   •   221 views   •   0 comments
 
 
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Dec 23 2013 - Because of my age, I often catch myself forgetting just how young is the space age. When my father was born, for example, no human had ever before left the atmosphere! In fact, it's only been 110 years since we first, as a species, succeeded in any form of heavier-than-air flight, and there are still 67 people currently alive who were born before t...
Bryan Healey   •   173 views   •   0 comments
 
 
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Dec 18 2013 - I recently wrote a guest column for the Sentinel and Enterprise (a local newspaper in my hometown) defending the prospect of a casino in Leominster, MA. I believe that the proposal could provide much-needed economic benefits to the city with minimal risk, and I outline my argument as follows...
Bryan Healey   •   211 views   •   0 comments
 
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Oct 01 2013 - According to a recent CNN/OPC poll, the approval rating for Congress (as a singular political body) has dropped to an all-time low of 10%. To put that into perspective, approximately 17% of English people believe the Loch Ness Monster is real. Congress is so utterly despised by the average American that I would image that there would be little reaction beyond a mild grunt were the entire lot to be fired tomorrow. And yet, oddly enough, not a single Senator has an approval rating below 15% and ma...
Bryan Healey   •   252 views   •   0 comments
 
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